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Romney On The Supreme Court

Monday, October 1, 2007  |  posted by Hugh Hewitt
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I will be broadcasting today from a forum in San Diego sponsored by California Citizens Against Lawsuit Abuse, devoting most of the program to legal reform and the SCOTUS.  It is the first Monday in October, always an important day to focus on the judiciary and the legal system in general.

An excellent statement from Mitt Romney on the day the SCOTUS opens its new term

The First Monday in October marks the beginning of the U.S. Supreme Court term. Cases in the upcoming term could dramatically impact the everyday lives of all Americans. The Court will face questions involving the death penalty, voter identification as a means of ensuring fair elections, efforts to stop child pornography, whether terrorists held as enemy combatants deserve special rights, and perhaps even our right to keep and bear arms. That is why it is important that we nominate justices in the strict constructionist mold of Roberts, Alito, Scalia and Thomas.

Today reminds us that a judge’s most solemn obligation is to the ‘rule of law,’ a phraseology of which I am particularly fond since it comes from the original Massachusetts constitution of 1780. It reminds us that those appointed to the federal bench must leave behind their partisan passions and retain only one: the passion for ‘equal justice under law.’ Respect and fidelity to the rule of law and equal justice under law must guide the judicial mind and, in fact, they are required by the oath all federal judges must take.

Those holding themselves out for the Presidency have an equally solemn obligation: to find women and men for judicial service who respect the rule of law and who will be faithful to the law as enacted. As President, I intend to nominate judges who respect the separation of powers, are committed to judicial restraint, and have a genuine appreciation of the text, structure, and history of our Constitution. The judges I nominate will recognize, as I do, that as Justice Scalia once said, the Court ought not take the field as some kind of ‘junior-varsity Congress.’ That would wrongl

Given the number of SCOTUS appointments likely in store for the next president, Romney’s views on the Court will matter a great deal in the primaries and will be a huge issue in the fall as well.  I expect that a second President Clinton would have at least four appointments and perhaps more. 

Just a reminder:

Justice John Paul Stevens is 87.
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is 74.
Justice Anthony Kennedy is 71.
Justice Antonin Scalia is 71.
Justice Stephen Breyer is 69.
Justice David Souter is 68.

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