Hugh Hewitt

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Evangelicals and Politics

Monday, December 15, 2008  |  posted by Hugh Hewitt

I have been devoting a lot of December’s programming to the future direction of the GOP, and will certainly be covering that ground when I broadcast from the Heritage Foundation in D.C. today.

I am also going to begin an on-air project between now and the Inauguration that will ask where Evangelicals and devout Catholics are headed when it comes to American politics. If you’d like to suggest a guest for that series of conversations, please do so via hugh@hughhewitt.com.

Off to the recently reopened Museum of American History.

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To D.C.

Sunday, December 14, 2008  |  posted by Hugh Hewitt

Broadcasting tomorrow and Wednesday from Heritage –Geraghty the Indispensable sits in for me Tuesday in his radio debut– and perhaps I can lure Rob Bluey, David All and Patrick Ruffini into the studio to advance my December project: Explaining the benefits of social media for conservatives. The triumph of the weekend was to lure Emmett of the Unblinking Eye into opening a Twitter account –@EOTUE. Disdain is easy to convey in 140 characters. Now if we can only figure out how to drive Fraters’ Peeps off the service. Background here. David All’s beginner’s guide here. Sign up as well at TopConservativesOnTwitter.org.

The White Whale of Twitter is David Allen White, though I suspect we will never catch him. I am carrying Don Quixote in anticipation of my great books interview with Dr. White on the same. If you’d like to listen to the first offering in the series on Tolstoy’s War and Peace and Melville’s Moby Dick, visit here.

DAW on Handel’s Messiah is here.

On Shakespeare here.

Next up, Cervantes and Dickens’ Great Expectations, and then the Divine Comedy. We are open to suggestions after that.

Handel's MessiahShakespeareLearning to Love the Great Books-Conversation 1-War and Peace and Moby Dick

Other guest suggestions for D.C.? Send them to me via Twitter using the hashtag #hhrs, driect @hughhewitt, or as always via e-mail, hugh@hughhewitt.com. Duane can also be contacted on Twitter @radioblogger and Adam @atomyoungman.

Frost/Nixon

Saturday, December 13, 2008  |  posted by Hugh Hewitt

I expected to dislike it, assuming that it would –as other biographers and directors have done– miss the complexity of RN and ignore his massive achievements or remarkable career.

But Frost/Nixon hit the mark, largely because of an amazing performance by Frank Langella as Nixon, which should earn him the Oscar. I joined RN’s staff in late 1978, more than a year after the Frost interviews, and they never mattered much in the conversations around Casa Pacifica. But Langella conveyed the imposing presence of the 37th president, a presence that flowed from having been at the center of events from 1948 forward, a participant in five presidential campaigns, a maker of war and peace, and a colleague of every world leader from Churchill through the end of the age of Reagan.

The movie’s closing moments misstate the significance of Nixon’s career after he emerged from exile and moved to New York in the spring of 1980. But the film does do justice to Nixon’s intellect and hints at his greatest triumphs, and even does a fair job of conveying Nixon’s own view of his fall.

Though Langella dominates the film and Michael Sheen’s Frost does not attempt to wrestle the spotlight away, two other performances are memorable. Kevin Bacon nails Jack Brennan, and Sam Rockwell’s James Reston Jr. does a wonderful job of conveying the consuming and often disfiguring hatred on the part of so many towards Nixon, a hatred that long preceded Watergate but the full-flowering of which Watergate allowed.

See The New Nixon for comments from two men, Frank Gannon (portrayed in the film) and John Taylor (who joined RN’s staff after the inerviews) who spent more time with Nixon after the resignation than anyone other than Brennan and the former president’s family. Gannon’s assessment of the accuracy of the actual events will be fascinating, and if John Taylor comments, future Nixon biographers should clip and save as Taylor knew Nixon in retirement better and longer than anyone not related by blood.

I’ll try and track down director Ron Howard and/or Langella for interviews.

DAW on Handel’s Messiah

Saturday, December 13, 2008  |  posted by Hugh Hewitt

Ever wondered what it is you are listening to and why it is such an amazing experience? Professor David Allen White explains it all for you.

Handel's Messiah

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