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Senator Tom Cotton On Keeping-Families-Together-At-Border-Without-Opening-Border And The ZTE Amendment To NDAA

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Senator Tom Cotton joined me this morning to discuss the amendment he co-authored re blocking sales of U.S. parts to ZTE and resolution of the families separated at border via the pending spending bill:

Audio:

06-19hhs-cotton

Transcript:

HH: Joined by United States Senator Tom Cotton from Arkansas. Good morning, Senator.

TC: Good morning, Hugh, good to be on with you.

HH: Thank you. Before I get to the border issue, I want to talk about ZTE and the fact that the Defense Authorization Act is going to pass the Congress with a ban on selling U.S. parts to the telecommunications company, ZTE. You are the author of this amendment. Why did you author it? And why are 85 senators supporting it?

TC: ZTE, Huawei and other Chinese telecom companies are virtual arms of the Chinese Communist Party, Hugh. They are grave threats to our national security and our telecommunications infrastructure as well as the privacy of American citizens. So I’m very pleased that the Senate adopted the amendment I had with Chris Van Hollen and Chuck Schumer to prohibit the federal government from buying their products, from loaning or granting money to American companies that use those products, as well as put ZTE on the sanctions list. Now we went farther than the House. We’ll have to reconcile our provisions with the House. I’m hopeful that we can move them in our direction, but that’ll be the subject of negotiations in the coming weeks.

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Bigotry is Bigotry

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Salena Zito’s latest NYPost column is about the Harvard course she developed to introduce Harvard undergrads to life in the Midwest.  It’s an eye opener.  I truly wonder how people could grow up and not have some level of experience with the kinds of things she is allowing these kids to experience.  When I was growing up such a lack of experience was available only to the deeply urban and in those days that generally meant deeply poor.  If you lived as I did, in the ‘burbs, farms were close enough that you picked up ag work as a odd job to pay for that new car or stereo or….  My dad was an executive type, but that meant summer jobs in the factories belonging to the business he worked for.  Neighbors owned small businesses, and so forth.  Life just brought about the experiences that these kids have to take a non-credit course to get.  That fact suggests some pretty amazing socio-economic change that is worth some serious exploration, but by others more qualified than me.

What I found most fascinating was the attitude changes these experiences brought to these kids.  Aren’t the current generations supposed to be the least bigoted, most enlightened our nation has ever produced?  Yet the divide illustrated by these efforts strikes this observer as essentially the same as the color line bigotries of my youth.  How is the concept of “flyover country” really that different than “the negro part of town?”

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PA Senator Pat Toomey On Children At The Border

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Pennsylvania Senator Pat Toomey joined em this morning:

Audio:
06-18hhs-toomey

Transcript:

HH: Joined now by United States Senator Pat Toomey from Pennsylvania. Good morning, Senator Toomey.

PT: Good morning, Hugh, thanks for having me.

HH: Always good to have you. I want to talk mostly tariffs, but I want to begin, you’ve known Attorney General Sessions for a long time in the Senate. Should the Attorney General reverse the zero tolerance policy that has led to the separation of 2,000 from their families at the border?

PT: Well, no, I don’t think he should reverse the fundamental policy, but there are some things we ought to look at doing differently, I think. First, I think the instance of the, you know, the heart-wrenching separation of a small child from the mother is, has been, the frequency’s been exaggerated significantly. There are serious challenges at the border like does the person claiming to be the parent, is that person actually the parent? There are problems of that nature. But at the end of the day, if we had family detention centers, and we had the law that permitted the use of family detention centers, then this problem would be enormously diminished.

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Father’s Day

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Twice this week, on Thursday and Friday, I wrote of how good people are made, not born.  I have so written because we seem to be short good people in highly visible positions these days.  The country is actually full of good people, but they are too busy being good to attract any attention.  And so we find our vision filled with bad examples.

Part of the reason for this is an absence of fathers.  The statistics are stunning:

  • An estimated 24.7 million children (33%) live absent their biological father.
  • Of students in grades 1 through 12, 39 percent (17.7 million) live in homes absent their biological fathers.
  • 57.6% of black children, 31.2% of Hispanic children, and 20.7% of white children are living absent their biological fathers.

Yes, those stats focus on biological fatherhood and there are alternatives, but those alternatives are not picked up that often.  The consequences of fatherlessness are stunning.  Just a few:

  • Children in father-absent homes are almost four times more likely to be poor. In 2011, 12 percent of children in married-couple families were living in poverty, compared to 44 percent of children in mother-only families.
  • Children of single-parent homes are more than twice as likely to commit suicide.
  • 71% of high school dropouts are fatherless; fatherless children have more trouble academically, scoring poorly on tests of reading, mathematics, and thinking skills; children from father-absent homes are more likely to be truant from school, more likely to be excluded from school, more likely to leave school at age 16, and less likely to attain academic and professional qualifications in adulthood.

Fathers matter.  And while today, as a holiday, is a creation of the greeting card companies, I think it a great day to consider the importance of fathers while we pour out our affection to each of our fathers. (Miss you Dad! – I have every day since you died.)  Despite our societal rejection of the Bible, it is simply chock full of wisdom about a lot of things – fathers among them.  I cannot think of a better way to consider fathers than to consider just a few Proverbs.

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